As most of you probably already know, I recently released a new EP called "See You On The Other Side," and have been really excited to share the new material, and hear your responses. Several people have recently asked me what it was like to make the music video for the title track, and what it's like making a video in general. While it can sometimes be a little awkward, it's definitely as awesome as you think it's going to be!

The first, and perhaps most essential, part of making a music video is choosing a great media crew to work with. For mine, my band and I went with Red Stallion Media, who do amazing work right here in Maine with the likes of The Mallett Brothers Band, Rustic Overtones and Spose. On top of their awesome work on the video, they also helped us develop a concept for what we were about to film.

Secondly, we had to choose a location. Seeing as it's our band hangout, we went with Howie's Pub in East Deering. That's Adam, one of the owners, who passes me the fries at the end of the video.

Then, of course, comes the actual filming. We needed extras for the up-close shots, and we were lucky to have friends, wives, and neighbors all volunteer. That's my uncle Steve in the shot at the bar, and my girlfriend's sister Signe using her phone.

What no one tells you about shooting a video is that it can be a little awkward. Being used to playing for an audience, it was a little odd to play unplugged and lip synch to a room full of cameras and lights. More awkward still were the close-up shots - neither of the extras were allowed to break character, and getting that close to someone who's not supposed to notice you can make for some uncomfortable humor. I accidentally spit in a couple faces, and might have rolled onto the guy in the booth a few times.

There were some pretty cool moments, too! The shot where my guitarist, Manny, kicks the fries in slow motion took a few takes to get right. I don't know what was funnier - the finished product, or everyone having to pick up the fries on the floor and reset them for another take.

Overall, though, the experience of making a music video is awesome - it's a chance to give your music a little bit of visual context, and an opportunity to say even more with the song as a result. Thanks to everyone who made this possible!