The countdown clock is about to hit double zero. The 10-day Skowhegan State Fair begins tomorrow and will run through Saturday the 21st.

Before we get to the food and fun, how about this stunning fact? The Skowhegan State Fair is 203 years old this year. Yes, that makes it the nation’s oldest consecutively running agricultural fair. Through thick and thin. World Wars, The Great Depression.  At least one pandemic. Since 1818.

I don’t know if you could get a turkey leg, or a corn dog, or an elephant’s ear or a doughboy back then. But I bet you can now.  Actually,  tomorrow.

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The grounds, on Constitution Avenue in Skowhegan, open at 7 a.m., the midway gets underway at 1 p.m. and the buildings are open daily from Noon until 10 p.m.

What is a fair without Midway rides, and live music every day, and all the agricultural exhibits and competitions. All events with times and costs are listed on the Fair’s website here.

Enjoy Harness Racing through the fair. Sunday the 15th through Saturday the 21st. Some post times at 1 p.m., some at 7 p.m.

One of the most exciting events is the Demolition Derbies, this year there will be 3 nights of fun at the Grandstand. Friday the 13th, Monday the 16th, and Friday the 20th, each night at 7 p.m.  As they call it “Smash ‘Em, Crash ‘Em”

Anyone else getting hungry again?  Always room for some cotton candy.

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The General Stores Of Downeast Maine

These are the long-time general stores that are spread throughout downeast Maine. The stores that your grandparents picked up milk, beer, and that night's dinner at. For years they had been filled with things like fly paper, clothes, beef jerky, and that morning's newspaper. Now, you stop by for that slice of breakfast pizza, a tasty fried chicken sandwich for lunch, gas,and a handful of lottery tickets.


They're an important part of Maine's heritage, and their numbers are starting to dwindle. But we still frequent them to pick up the day's necessities and to keep up on town gossip.


They may not be owned by the original owners, and they may not look the same as they did years and years ago. But that same hometown feeling is there, the minute you set foot on their wooden floors. More than likely the same wooden floors that your grandparents set foot on.